Yenra : Security : Byte Wars : Addressing government officials, corporate executives, IT managers, programmers, and citizens

Byte Wars: The Impact of September 11 on Information Technology by by Edward Yourdon - Byte Wars: The Impact of September 11 on Information Technology compiles software developer Edward Yourdon's timely concerns about 21st-century IT security. Specifically addressing government officials, corporate executives, IT managers, programmers, and citizens, he identifies risks to safety, privacy, and other fundamental values and provides concrete steps they (that is, we) can take to disarm threats.

The September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks are transforming information technology, leading to profound and permanent changes. In this book, Ed Yourdon--legendary software engineering expert and author of Decline and Fall of the American Programmer--focuses on the immediate changes IT professionals are already encountering and the long-term changes they must prepare for. Yourdon addresses 9/11's impact on IT at every level: strategic, national, corporate, and personal. Coverage includes:

* "Thinking the unthinkable": Identifying and managing risks you've never considered

* New "decade of security" that is following the '90s "decade of productivity" and the '80s "decade of quality"

* Privacy landscape changed forever: what it means to your organization--and to you

* New threats, new paradigms, new counter measures (the balance of security vs. functionality)

* "Death March," security, disaster recovery, and contingency planning projects

* The new balance of security vs. functionality

* Increasing the resilience of your IT infrastructure

* Grassroots, peer-to-peer collaboration: responding to tomorrow's unpredictable, chaotic crises

Yourdon doesn't just present problems: he outlines specific strategy options designed to lead to more effective decision-making--for IT professionals, projectmanagers and senior corporate executives, government leaders, and citizens alike. "One of the ten most influential men and women in the software field." --Crosstalk magazine